Monday, April 16, 2007

How many projects is too many?



Since childhood, I have been a better "starter" than "finisher". Whether it was sewing, knitting, painting - I always had multiple projects on the go. Just part of the DNA and the way my brain is wired, I guess. The same is definitely true when it comes to my hooking.

Right now, I have at least 8 unfinished projects (and that is probably an understatement). Some of these probably only need an hour to finish. Some need a lifetime. Others, including two fine shading projects (including the one in the picture), may serve as teaching pieces in their unfinished state - and I don't have a problem with that. Who says teaching pieces have to be complete, when teaching and learning never are.

These pieces have all been set aside because of another 'inspiration'. I call the ones that are the most challenging my "experimental farm". They usualy begin with a "what if" or "I wonder" and they are the most exciting ones, since they are all a creative excursion that needed to be started, but may never be finished. And it won't matter if they are.

If I have an idea in my head that I need to see in wool, I put aside my other projects and jump in. And my batting average is pretty good. I have ended up with hooked bags, belts and hats that were experiments. I loved doing them. They encourage me to be fearless and remind me that if you don't try, you'll never know if it would have worked or not.

I have real respect for hookers who finish every project before moving on to another one. I think that shows discipline and a different mind set. For them, seeing the project finished well is the joy, and part of their DNA. There are definitely days when I wish I were a bit more like that. Think of the storage space I would save!

However, I am not about to change, and will therefore accept this as my lot in hooking. Perhaps when I have retired, I will find the time and the discipline to finish all the projects set aside. However, I have my doubts. The reality is that the more time I have to spend the more likely I am to increase the size of my experimental farm and my unfinished projects.

But I'm o.k. with that.

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